Catalogue des appareils cinématographiques de la Cinémathèque française et du CNC

Accueil > Collection > Projecteur de film 35 mm

Projecteur de film 35 mm

N° Inventaire : AP-95-1652

Collection : La Cinémathèque française

Catégorie d'appareil : Projection lumineuse cinématographique

Nom du modèle : Edison Projecting Kinetoscope 97 Model (Spool bank, spoolbank)

Numéro de fabrication : n° 33

Lieu de fabrication : New Jersey, Orange, Etats-Unis

Année de fabrication : 1897

Fiche détaillée

Type de l'appareil

lanterne à lampe à arc électrique et cuve à eau ; base en bois avec support pour la lanterne et le projecteur ; support "Spool bank" à dix-sept rouleaux-guides feutrés ; entraînement du film 35 mm par croix de Malte à quatre branches ; un débiteur denté ; quatre rouleaux-guides feutrés ; une manivelle et roue en fonte ; fenêtre réglable ; obturateur une pale en mica

Auteurs

Edison Thomas Alva
Orange, N.J.

Fabricants

Edison Manufacturing Company
New Jersey, Orange

Utilisateurs

Edison Thomas Alva
Orange, N.J.

Distributeurs

Maguire & Baucus Limited
New York, Pine Street

Sujet du modèle

Informations non disponibles

Objectif

4 cm Ø

Taille de l'objet

Ouvert :
Informations non disponibles

Fermé :
Longueur : 153 cm
Largeur : 33 cm
Hauteur : 126 cm

Diamètre :
Informations non disponibles

Taille de la boîte de transport

Informations non disponibles

Remarques

Plaque métallique : "Edison Projecting Kinetoscope, manufactured by Edison MFG. Co, Orange, N.J., USA. N° 33".

"Edison projecting-kinetoscope. This marvelous instrument, the latest product of the Edison laboratory, projects apparently living figures and actual scenes upon a canvas or screen. Its represents the very highest branch in the art of photography : that of bringing before the eye an exact life size reproduction of life motion with all ilts accompanying effects of light, shade and expression. [...] Steadiness. the absence of any vibratory or wavering motion in the projected scene. This is accomplished by improved steadying devices. No flickering. A brillant light without any unpleasant flickering is produced by a specially designed Hand Feed Arc Lamp, which is provided with resistance coil and is suitable for use on any direct or alternating current of not over 200 volts. Power. Hand Motor which can always be relied upon to do the work and do it properly, with which Tableaux effects can be accomplished and the speed of reproduction can be regulated to na nicety in conformity with the action of the subject. [...] Large picture. It projects a picture even greater than life size, if desired, without distortion or indistinctness and also without the use of special gauge film, being made to Edison Standard. It is fitted with a special "Wide Angle" objective lense giving a field to feet high by 13 1/3 feet wide, at a distance of about forty feet from screen ; proportionately larger or smaller pictures may be had by increasing or decreasing this distance. [...] Simplicity. Only one operator is necessary, whereas almost every other machine requires two. [...] Adaptability. The complete instrument is mounted on a hardwood base board which can be placed upon any ordinary table or stand. It is furnished with a spool bank for endless films which will allow the repretion of a scene any number of times and enables immediate answer to an encore. It also has reels for "feed" and "take up" each of which has a capacity of at least six 50 foot film strips. [...] Projecting Kinetoscope, "97" Model, $ 100, £ 21, inclunding Hand power mechanism. Wide angle objective lenses. Extra quality condensing lense. Improved hand feed arc lamp. Russia iron lamp house. Resistance coil in sheet iron casing. Spool bank (detachable) for endless films. Three reels capacity six 50 foot films each. Oak case with carrying handle (for mechanism when not in use). Knife switch with all connections. Oil can and bottle oil" (brochure Edison Projecting-Kinetoscope "97" Model, New York, Maguire & Baucus, 189.

Bibliographie

Brochure Edison Projecting-Kinetoscope "97" Model, New York, Maguire & Baucus, 1897.